Planet Chant

Posted By MiOd On Saturday, July 13, 2013 Under , ,
For centuries, chanting has played a major role in religious and spiritual life. Chanting was an important part of Hindu and Jewish gatherings back when the Bhagavad-Gita and the Old Testament were written, and it became just as important to religious sects that came along after the birth of Christ (including the Roman Catholic Church and various sects of Islam). This ambitious compilation, which Triloka released in 2001, spotlights a variety of chanting from different parts of the world. Triloka tends to favor a contemporary approach; keyboards and synthesizers are prominent on Planet Chant, and most of the artists put a modern spin on chanting. So purists are advised to look elsewhere, but those who appreciate a past-meets-present approach will find a lot to admire about the CD. Planet Chant is fairly unpredictable; during the course of the album, Triloka visits South Africa (Ladysmith Black Mambazo) and Pakistan (the late Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan), as well as Bulgaria (Angelite) and Russia (the Russian State Symphony Cappella). Primeaux & Mike's "Cathedral" draws on Native American traditions, while Lama Gyurme and Jean-Philippe Rykiel's "Offering Chant" is inspired by Tibetan Buddhism. Is Planet Chant the last word on modern chanting? Definitely not. But it's an intriguing compilation that shows how well the past and the present are interacting in different parts of the world.

For centuries, chanting has played a major role in religious and spiritual life. Chanting was an important part of Hindu and Jewish gatherings back when the Bhagavad-Gita and the Old Testament were written, and it became just as important to religious sects that came along after the birth of Christ (including the Roman Catholic Church and various sects of Islam). This ambitious compilation, which Triloka released in 2001, spotlights a variety of chanting from different parts of the world. Triloka tends to favor a contemporary approach; keyboards and synthesizers are prominent on Planet Chant, and most of the artists put a modern spin on chanting. So purists are advised to look elsewhere, but those who appreciate a past-meets-present approach will find a lot to admire about the CD. Planet Chant is fairly unpredictable; during the course of the album, Triloka visits South Africa (Ladysmith Black Mambazo) and Pakistan (the late Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan), as well as Bulgaria (Angelite) and Russia (the Russian State Symphony Cappella). Primeaux & Mike's "Cathedral" draws on Native American traditions, while Lama Gyurme and Jean-Philippe Rykiel's "Offering Chant" is inspired by Tibetan Buddhism. Is Planet Chant the last word on modern chanting? Definitely not. But it's an intriguing compilation that shows how well the past and the present are interacting in different parts of the world. ~ Alex HendersonCMJ (2/19/01, p.42) - "...Spans the gamut of global trance-inducing and inspirational music."
Dirty Linen (8-9/01, p.81) - "...Spiritually uplifting..."

01. Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan & Michael Brook - Lament
02. Lama Gyurme & Jean Phillipe Rykiel - Offering Chant
03. Russian State Symphony - Fervent Supplication
04. Sheila Chandra - Quiet 8
05. Primeaux & Mike - Cathedral
06. Choying Drolma & Steve Tibbetts - Kyamdro Semkye
07. Ladysmith Black Mambazo - Silgugu Isiphambano
08. Krishna Das - Jaya Bhagavan
09. Saraband - Polorum Regina
10. Angelite (The Bulgarian Voices) - Great Litany
11. Oberton-Chor Dusseldorf - Confirmation
12. Jim Donovan - Indigo

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